Oops... something went wrong!

My Ireland

Looking for inspiration? Planning a trip? Or just want to scroll yourself happy? We'll show you an Ireland that's tailor-made for you.

FFFFFF-0 FFFFFF-0

    See what Ireland has in store for you

    hill-of-tara hill-of-tara

    Hill of Tara

    The Hill of Tara is an archaeological site situated between Navan and Dunshaughlin in County Meath. Containing a number of ancient monuments, it was the seat of the High King of Ireland and the most important centre of political and religious power.
    County Meath
    Culture and Heritage
    35mins from Dublin Airport

    An ancient seat of power, 142 kings and a "stone of destiny"... welcome to the historic epicentre of royal life in Ireland.

    These striking ridges of once dominant ring forts offer much more than just incredible views of the lush County Meath countryside. They tell old tales of kings, gods and sacred rituals. This place has been an important site of worship and a coveted seat of power since pre-Christian times, and it overflows with the myths and legends that make Ireland’s Ancient East so endlessly fascinating.

    Castleboy, Co. Meath
    (046) 902 5903
    hill-of-tara-vertical-image hill-of-tara-vertical-image

    Hill of Tara, County Meath

    Views fit for a king

    The Hill of Tara is best known as being an ancient seat of power on the island. It was from atop this hill that 142 kings oversaw their kingdom – quite literally, as it is said that on a clear day you can see half of the counties of Ireland from this spot!

    The Hill of Tara is Ireland's most sacred stretch of turf, occupying a place at the heart of Irish history, legend and folklore.

    Lonely Planet

    However, this was no ordinary kingship, for it followed no family lineage. The king of Ireland was chosen by the Lia Fail, or "Stone of Destiny". According to Irish mythology, this coronation stone was brought to the Hill of Tara by ancient Celtic gods, the Tuatha Dé Danann, as one of their sacred objects. It is said to let out a great roar when touched by the rightful king of Tara.

    Try your luck, brace yourself, and give it a pat. You never know, you may discover you are the next king or queen of Ireland!

    You can just feel the magical energy in this place

    OMUSETTE, TRIPADVISOR

    Hill of Tara, County Meath

    L-R: the Lia Fail or "Stone of Destiny"; pre-Christian burial mound known as the Mound of the Hostages; visiting the Hill of Tara; the statue of Saint Patrick watches from atop the hill

    Enter the world of eternal joy

    Between 4000-2,500BC, the people of Tara believed the hill to be an entrance to the otherworld – the site where gods entered our world. So important was this otherworld legacy to the future kingship that the high kings of Tara, on their inauguration, had to symbolically marry the goddess Medb in order to become king! Medb, you see, was believed to have originally come from the Otherworld.

    It is a sacred and symbolic site constructed from burial mounds, ditches, banks, and ritual stones.

    National Geographic

    This importance of the pagan religion in Tara also led to a historic encounter between St Patrick and the high kings on the Hill of Tara. Legend goes that St Patrick, on his mission to bring Christianity to Ireland, first travelled here to confront the pagan king, Laoghaire, at the religion’s most powerful site, to announce that Christianity had arrived to Ireland.

    hill-of-tara-vertical-image-two hill-of-tara-vertical-image-two

    Visitor Centre at the Hill of Tara, County Meath

    hill-of-tara-large-image hill-of-tara-large-image

    Hill of Tara, County Meath

    Raiders of the Hill of Tara

    The Irish are known for their storytelling, and the Hill of Tara is no exception when it comes to some rather legendary tales. If there are any Indiana Jones fans out there, the Hill of Tara is believed to be the site of the infamous Arc of the Covenant. In fact, in 1899, a group of British-Israelites was convinced the Arc lay beneath the Hill of Tara. They didn’t find it, of course, and there were also protests against excavating this sacred site.

    But you have to admit, it does add a little more magic and intrigue to the site!

    County Meath highlights

    Don't miss these things to see and do